CenturyLink plans to reach 14M households with 100 Mbps over copper via vectoring

CenturyLink sees fiber as a key to its broadband strategy, but in places where it can't make the business case work for fiber the telco is confident that bonding and vectoring will enable it to deliver 100 Mbps and higher speeds over existing copper.

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CenturyLink plans to reach 14M households with 100 Mbps over copper via vectoring

Carrier "Next Generation Network" Initiatives Rarely are Easy, Often are Not Successful

It wouldn’t be unfair to note that telecom industry “next generation network” initiatives often have failed to get traction. Integrated Services Digital Network and Broadband-ISDN (now called Asynchronous Transfer Mode) provide examples. More recently, IP Multimedia Subsystem and Rich Communications Service have been proposed as next generation network platforms. In similar fashion, network functions virtualization represents the latest carrier effort to overall the physical layer of public networks

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Carrier "Next Generation Network" Initiatives Rarely are Easy, Often are Not Successful

One Way Google Fiber Has Changed Regulator Thinking

Google Fiber has, in one respect, changed the way service providers and regulators look at deployment of local access networks. Traditionally, telecom and cable TV regulators have expected and demanded full coverage of all homes in a service territory. What is different now is that regulators have embraced the notion that high-performance networks get deployed faster when they can be “spot deployed” in some neighborhoods first, with no regard for end user demand. And Internet service providers increasingly are timing their new builds on a “fiberhood” basis, responding to demand from residents

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One Way Google Fiber Has Changed Regulator Thinking

One Way Google Fiber Has Changed Regulator Thinking

Google Fiber has, in one respect, changed the way service providers and regulators look at deployment of local access networks. Traditionally, telecom and cable TV regulators have expected and demanded full coverage of all homes in a service territory. What is different now is that regulators have embraced the notion that high-performance networks get deployed faster when they can be “spot deployed” in some neighborhoods first, with no regard for end user demand. And Internet service providers increasingly are timing their new builds on a “fiberhood” basis, responding to demand from residents

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One Way Google Fiber Has Changed Regulator Thinking

Deutsche Telekom Faces Same Challenge as Many U.S. Service Providers

Most telecom executives, especially those facing growing competition from cable operators, have had to ask hard questions about their options for upgrading access networks. The simple fact is that a full replacement of the network to fiber to the home technology is expensive.

Analysis: How do you monetize content? Think laterally.

Understanding what your customers needs and finding different ways of looking at a business case is the key to digital survival.

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Analysis: How do you monetize content? Think laterally.

"Video Will Replace Voice and Text" for Business Communications in 5 Years"

Video will become the new business norm for communication and collaboration over the next five to 10 years, says Henry Dewing, Forrester Research analyst. In fact, says Dewing, “video will replace voice and text communications as the preferred method of communication in business and personal life.” Those of you accustomed to technology projections might agree that the direction is right, but the timing is probably wrong. Still, three years ago, most buyers and users perceived the predictions of impending video traffic as all hype, says Dewing. But a combination of technology maturity, end user demand and competitive pressures are driving interest. As often is the case, the initial business case starts with saving money on travel costs

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"Video Will Replace Voice and Text" for Business Communications in 5 Years"

Amazon Sells More Kindle Books than Physical, On Christmas Day At Least

In a milestone of sorts, on Christmas day, Amazon sold more Kindle books than physical titles, the company says. . But Kindle content sales have a problem akin to YouTube’s similar problem. The device and application are popular, and getting more traction. But the company loses money on new releases and makes only a modest amount on older titles, thus losing an estimated $1 per Kindle book sale

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Amazon Sells More Kindle Books than Physical, On Christmas Day At Least

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