Arris, Jinni and Huawei find new opportunities in evolving cable MSO market

Whether it's the emergence of new OTT video players, 4K or the FCC's “Unlock the Box” proposal, it's clear that cable industry manufacturer and services segment is facing a challenging yet innovative period.

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Arris, Jinni and Huawei find new opportunities in evolving cable MSO market

Satellite Market Shows Classic Signs of Competitor Behavior in Deregulating Industries

Some trends are “evergreen” in the communications business, or have been so since the advent of deregulation, new technology and competition starting in the 1980s globally. Among the recurring themes is pricing instability–or pricing wars–in virtually every segment of the business, driven by new competitors with disruptive price offers based on use of new technology. So it is not surprising that U.K.-based satellite services provider Talia warns of pricing wars in many regional satellite markets. “It is becoming a price war among satellite operators,” Alan Afrasiab, Talia CEO told Via Satellite

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Satellite Market Shows Classic Signs of Competitor Behavior in Deregulating Industries

Part 2: How UC Brings Instant Satisfaction for Enterprise Communication

This Industry Viewpoint was authored by Gary Gluzman, Executive Director of Product Development, MetTel, and is the second of two parts. In Part 1 of the series , we discussed the emergence of Unified Communications (UC) and the overwhelming desire to always be one step closer to making conversations as close to in-person as possible, without actually being in-person. This desire is what’s pushed … [ visit site to read more ]

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Part 2: How UC Brings Instant Satisfaction for Enterprise Communication

Asia-Pacific demand keeps pay-TV on track to reach 50% of homes globally

Despite the emergence of next-generation video services, the pay-TV market is still going strong. ABI Research said in a recent report that worldwide, pay TV has penetrated almost half of all homes, and should reach 1 billion homes by 2017.

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Asia-Pacific demand keeps pay-TV on track to reach 50% of homes globally

Would Verizon and AT&T Consider a "Use Best Network" Approach on Steroids?

It looks as though we might relatively soon get new tests of the value of network agnostic access . If Google launches its own mobile service, relying on Wi-Fi, Sprint and T-Mobile US networks we might start to get a sense of how 5G mobile networks will operate, aggregating the best access “available right now.” Whether that devalues or enhances the value of any specific retail operator’s offering remains to be seen, though 5G supporters obviously believe such “any network” access will enhance value for any retail mobile services provider. Comcast is expected to do something along those lines, using a “Wi-Fi first” approach. Cablevision Systems Corp., in one sense, is using the “legacy” approach, relying on an owned network solely

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Would Verizon and AT&T Consider a "Use Best Network" Approach on Steroids?

Phablets Could be Big for Developing Markets

The controversy about phablets (some think it is a momentary fad , others think it is something more, and will grow ) could have some implications for broadband usage in many parts of the developing world, irrespective of what it could mean for consumers who want a smart phone with a bigger screen . And that implication is that users who already have demonstrated huge appetite for mobile phones, and will soon want to use the Internet on a more convenient screen, might gravitate to phablet devices as a sort of “best of both worlds” approach to devices. We’ll have to wait and see, but the emergence first of smart phones and now tablets has begun to make concrete the notion that in many markets, the most-popular computer people use will be a mobile device of some type.

Phablets Could be Big for Developing Markets

The controversy about phablets (some think it is a momentary fad , others think it is something more, and will grow ) could have some implications for broadband usage in many parts of the developing world, irrespective of what it could mean for consumers who want a smart phone with a bigger screen . And that implication is that users who already have demonstrated huge appetite for mobile phones, and will soon want to use the Internet on a more convenient screen, might gravitate to phablet devices as a sort of “best of both worlds” approach to devices. We’ll have to wait and see, but the emergence first of smart phones and now tablets has begun to make concrete the notion that in many markets, the most-popular computer people use will be a mobile device of some type.

How 4G LTE Might TransformiThe Mobile Ecosystem

Will Long Term Evolution 4G transformthe mobile ecosystem? Possibly,

Before the Web, there was "Teletext"

“Ceefax,” the

Survey says: Consumers are still willing to pay for content

While many industry pundits have said that the emergence of online video providers like Netflix ( Nasdaq: NFLX ) and Hulu are speeding the inevitable death of traditional video service players, new numbers in a recent J.D. Power and Associates study show that subscribers are maintaining their multichannel video programming distributor (MVPD) subscriptions. Jim Barthold, editor of FierceIPTV , sounds off on how not all subscribers are ready to cut the traditional video cord. Commentary

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Survey says: Consumers are still willing to pay for content

DirecTV, DishGetting Justice Department Scrutiny Over Programming Contracts?

DirecTV

Consumers Will Store More Than 1/3 of Their Digital Content in the Cloud by 2016

The desire to share content and to access it on multiple devices will motivate consumers to start storing a third of their digital content in the cloud by 2016, according to Gartner.

Consumer Mobile App Revenues to Pass $50 billion by 2016

Juniper Research has projected that annual revenues from consumer mobile applications will approach $52 billion by 2016 as consumer smart phone adoption accelerates in tandem with the emergence of a mass tablet market.

ROADM and WSS components to resume growth in 2012

ROADM and Wavelength Selective Switch (WSS) component suppliers, according to Infonetics’ latest ROADM Components report, will start to see revenues begin to grow this year. Following a 124 percent revenue surge in 2010, global ROADM WSS component revenue contracted by about 5 percent in 2011 due to supply issues. With those issues resolved,Andrew Schmitt, directing analyst for optical markets at Infonetics, expects the market segment “will resume growing this year and maintain annual revenue growth in the range of about 15% to 20% for the next few years.” Despite the slowdown in component sales, WDM ROADM-based optical equipment grew 36 percent over 2010, surpassing WSS module sales. However, unit shipments of ROADM WSS components are forecast to grow faster than revenue due various issues including price reductions and a migration to smaller 1×4 WSS sizes as service providers deploy ROADMs on the edges of their respective networks.

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ROADM and WSS components to resume growth in 2012

Mobile Shopping Shifts

A recent survey of end users shows a significant shift of mobile device commerce types. In the past, it mostly has been virtual and digital goods that people have bought directly from their mobile devices. Games, ring tones, songs and other content are prime examples. Over the last couple of years, though, the amount of physical goods purchased directly from a mobile has shifted. More users are buying physical goods than ever before.

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Mobile Shopping Shifts

LTE Will Mean Higher Mobile Broadband Substitution

Few seem to doubt these days that mobile solutions have become functional substitutes for fixed line network products, with voice service being the obvious example. The new issue, especially as fourth generation networks are deployed and marketed, is the potential amount of potential product substitution for fixed line broadband. There seems little opposition to the notion that some significant potential for product substitution does exist, and not only in emerging markets where mobile broadband “will be broadband” much as “mobile voice is voice” and as the mobile phone is the primary way people in many markets will use the Internet. Some would say the emergence of the mobile personal hotspot is a major enabler, as well, allowing a single mobile connection to serve multiple devices, instead of “one PC.” Surveys by U.K. regulator Ofcom might be illustrative

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LTE Will Mean Higher Mobile Broadband Substitution

Ohio-based broadband stimulus projects delayed by fiber cable shortages

While the federal government’s move to tighten its reins on the broadband stimulus work process is necessary to drive out fraud and waste, one unforeseen problem stimulus grant winners are seeing is that their fiber cable suppliers can’t keep up, meaning some projects are being delayed. Case in point is Consolidated Electric Cooperative (CEC). The utility is building out a 200 mile fiber network from the north side of Ohio’s Columbus into Richland and Knox counties. But as reported in The Columbus Dispatch , CEC won’t get the fiber cable it needs from its supplier Draka Communications until January despite ordering it in June.

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Ohio-based broadband stimulus projects delayed by fiber cable shortages

International IP/VPN port prices continue to decline

Multinational corporations looking for economical MPLS IP VPN connections will be happy to know that port prices are continually coming down in major U.S. domestic and international cities. According to new data from TeleGeography’s Enterprise Network Pricing Service, median port prices in competitive regional markets, including the U.S. and Europe, decreased by over 25 percent.

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International IP/VPN port prices continue to decline

Vodafone NZ becomes Pacific Fibre’s largest New Zealand customer

Pacific Fibre, an emerging submarine cable operator, has signed up Vodafone New Zealand as one of its first foundation customers. Russell Stanners, Vodafone New Zealand’s CEO, said that the emergence of the Pacific Fibre cable system will provide it with another option for international bandwidth capacity. “This deal will allow us to scale our customer offers over the next 10 years delivering the quality and quantity of capacity that our customers need now and into the future,” he said. “This will help us to support New Zealanders’ online ambitions by making sure they can confidently connect to the world and the world can confidently connect to New Zealand.” As one of its largest deals in New Zealand, the agreement with Vodafone New Zealand comes not long after it secured deals with REANNZ, which runs New Zealand’s ‘Karen’ science and education broadband network, and Australian ISP iiNet

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Vodafone NZ becomes Pacific Fibre’s largest New Zealand customer

Washington State breaks ground on its NoaNet middle mile expansion project

Washington State is moving ahead with the expansion of its Northwest Open Access Network (NoaNet) middle mile network.

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