Sigfox Launches 100-City U.S. IoT Network

Sigfox, the Internet of Things communications network, is deploying across 100 U.S. cities in 2016.  Sigfox operates in the non-licensed ISM bands (similar to Wi-Fi), using the 868 MHz band in Europe and the 902 MHz band in the United States. Sigfox is optimized for low-power, low-bandwidth Internet of Things devices that must communicate over metropolitan area distances. By way of comparison, Sigfox signals propagate further than GSM (2G) signals

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Sigfox Launches 100-City U.S. IoT Network

Fiber M&A: CITIC Buys Linx Telecommunications

There was some interesting international consolidation this morning.  A Chinese telecommunications company made a move on a chunk of fiber in eastern Europe, or more specifically in the Baltics.  Hong Kong based CITIC Telecom is acquiring Linx Telecommunications.

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Fiber M&A: CITIC Buys Linx Telecommunications

Vodafone M-Pesa Mobile Money Has 25 Million Active Users

Vodafone’s M-Pesa mobile money business has exceeded 25 million active users across Africa, Asia and Europe, Vodafone says. Across markets in Africa, Asia and Europe, active customers of M-Pesa increased by 27.1 percent in the year ended 31 March 2016, boosted by market launches in Albania and Ghana and supported by a network of more than 261,000 agents in 11 M-Pesa countries. In India, M-Pesa enables Indian customers to pay for goods on Ebay, for taxis with TabCab and to book train tickets on India’s national railways.  Enterprises including Walmart are using M-Pesa in India to improve cash management and business efficiency, Vodafone says.

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Vodafone M-Pesa Mobile Money Has 25 Million Active Users

Juniper Pulls Back Q1 Guidance

In what is hopefully not an early indicator for the sector, yesterday after the market closed Juniper Networks reeled in its estimates for the first quarter .  They cited weaker than expected demand from big operators in both the US and Europe, as well as the delayed timing of certain deployments.   … [ visit site to read more ]

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Juniper Pulls Back Q1 Guidance

AT&T, Level 3 international Ethernet expansion threatens BT, Orange’s hold

AT&T and Level 3 have become greater competitive threats in the global Ethernet market to BT and Orange by continually expanding their service offerings and presence in Europe and other countries outside of North America.

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AT&T, Level 3 international Ethernet expansion threatens BT, Orange’s hold

Mobile Account Churn Drivers Vary, Globally

Though it is undoubtedly true that network performance is a significant churn driver, nothing is more important than price, for nearly a third of consumers who left one mobile service provider for another, according to 451 Research. Other surveys show an even bigger price driver. “Price” was reported to be the churn rationale for 38 percent to 55 percent of polled consumers in Europe and the United States. Price was less an issue in Asia, the Middle East and Africa, where a variety of reasons other than price, service coverage or customer service contributed to churn decisions. Yet other surveys suggest that mobile Internet access quality is a serious churn driver.

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Mobile Account Churn Drivers Vary, Globally

Zayo net installs rise to $6.4M as provider narrows net losses to $10.8M

Zayo Group continues to see its fiber network builds throughout the United States and Europe pay off as a number of new customer wins drove fiscal second quarter gross installs to $6.4 million and net installs to a near-record $2.2 million.

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Zayo net installs rise to $6.4M as provider narrows net losses to $10.8M

Telco Execs Understand Their Problems; Solutions are the Issue

Decades ago, it would not have been unusual to hear skeptics argue that “telcos don’t get it,” when evaluating the magnitude of transformations that might be required for success in an Internet era. One rarely hears such sentiments any longer. Rarely, if ever, can a telecom executive be found who does not recognize the need for transformation, and the need for partners to make that transition. That should not be surprising. It has been nearly three decades since global telcos actually developed their core technology and core products “in house,” for a variety of reasons.  With the growth of the Internet, use of Internet Protocol for virtually all networks, the decoupling of apps from access and digital transformation of most retail and commercial processes, no telco actually has the ability to develop “in house.” Nor is there time or money to do so  Rarely, if ever, will any executive actually claim that core apps will be developed “in house.” And that applies as much to rearchitecting organizational processes and systems as to customer-facing app creation

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Telco Execs Understand Their Problems; Solutions are the Issue

When Private Equity Gets Involved, There Usually is a Problem

Private equity investors over the past couple of decades have mostly tended to get involved in ownership of telecom companies primarily during the Internet investment boom of the late 1990s, and generally in roles similar to that of venture capital. Occasionally, private equity gets involved only in smaller or moderate-size telecom deals where there is distress of some sort. That has been the case for Portugal Telecom and Hawaiian Telcom .

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When Private Equity Gets Involved, There Usually is a Problem

Ofcom Chief Opposes 3, O2 Merger

A decision to approve the proposed U.K. merger of O2 and Three lies with the Europe Commission’s antitrust regulator Margrethe Vestager, not Ofcom, the U.K. regulator. And some might argue the merger, which would have faced high obstacles, will face higher obstacles.

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Ofcom Chief Opposes 3, O2 Merger

Rapid SMB Cloud SaaS Adoption Since 2011

How has small and medium-sized business adoption of cloud services changed over the last several years? By some estimates, the answer is rapid adoption, with annual adoption rates as high as 40 percent. In 2011, a Spiceworks survey of cloud adoption among SMBs found that smaller SMBs were more aggressive when it comes to cloud adoption than their larger SMB counterparts. At least in terms of expectations, 38 percent of SMBs with fewer than 20 employees used or planned to use cloud solutions within six months. Some 17 percent of organizations with between 20 and 99 and 22 percent of organizations with more than 100 employees planned to use cloud services over the same time period.

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Rapid SMB Cloud SaaS Adoption Since 2011

Why IoT is Necessary

There is an easy way to illustrate why there is so much interest and effort in the mobile industry around “Internet of Things.” Simply, every other major product category is mature, or declining. The next wave of products to drive revenue growth must be discovered or created, and IoT seems the best candidate for such growth. Though we might not have always seen telecom products as having life cycles, that appears to be the case. First fixed network voice, then messaging, then “talking” have experienced either declining usage, or declining revenue, or both.

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Why IoT is Necessary

Vodafone Expands Gigabit Networks in Ireland, Portugal

Vodafone Group has begun deploying gigabit Internet access services in Ireland as part of its initiative to connect small towns (4,000 homes or more) to fiber-to-home networks by the end of 2018. Carrigaline in Country Cork is the first of 51 Irish towns to receive access. Ireland is the first country in Europe to use electricity infrastructure to deploy end-to-end fiber directly to the premises on a nationwide basis. Vodafone Group also announced a €125 million expansion of its FTTH network in Portugal, offering speeds of up to 1 gigabit per second to 2.75 million homes and businesses across the country by the end of 2016

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Vodafone Expands Gigabit Networks in Ireland, Portugal

No Network is "Always Best," But Mobile Comes Close, in Consumer Market

As a rule, no single access platform is “best” for every deployment scenario, even if mobile networks globally have proven to be the most-affordable for most people, most places. Still, the relevance of satellite delivery, fixed wireless, specialized business networks and potentially new platforms (low earth orbit satellite constellations, balloons and drones) cannot be denied, even if it is likely most of those new solutions might wind up providing backhaul for mobile networks. Sometimes the advantage of “specialized” networks comes from customer demand, at other times from the characteristics of the access platform. Optical networks serving enterprises or satellite TV networks serving consumers in rural areas are examples of specialized demand or cost-optimized delivery. Still, it is hard to discount the growing “primary” reliance on mobile networks for most consumer purposes

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No Network is "Always Best," But Mobile Comes Close, in Consumer Market

Chorus to Outsource Network Management to Alcatel-Lucent

New Zealand wholesale network operator Chorus has awarded Alcatel-Lucent a five-year managed services contract covering 24/7 monitoring of the operator’s nationwide wholesale copper network. Under the agreement, Alcatel-Lucent will provide real-time monitoring and analysis services from a new network operation center in Hamilton working with an additional NOC in Bangalore, India to provide monitoring aimed at preventing faults, improving network availability and ensuring continuous service quality of the copper network. The contract is part of a long-standing trend in telecommunications, where service providers outsource network management functions to third parties, or actually divest assets such as networks of cell towers, or, in the case of Telecom New Zealand, the entire network. That throws light on an old question (largely rhetorical) about what the typical telecom operator’s core competence might be.

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Chorus to Outsource Network Management to Alcatel-Lucent

The EU Votes for Net Neutrality, Killing It?

Regulatory headlines out of Europe today are a bit contradictory. The European parliament has passed network neutrality regulation by a vote of 500-163, enshrining the concept in law continent-wide alongside a nice crop of loopholes that have opponents up in arms.  … [ visit site to read more ]

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The EU Votes for Net Neutrality, Killing It?

Spectrum Sharing that Does Not Displace Licensed Users is Coming

Spectrum sharing can take any number of forms, some methods being nearly indistinguishable from spectrum leasing, other forms using the model set by Wi-Fi (essentially uncoordinated sharing), and newer forms relying on various forms of spatial sharing (sharing allowed in some areas, not in others), time-based sharing (as some radio or TV broadcasters might do) and coordinated sharing (either using databases or cognitive radios). One of the newer thinking about sharing involves sharing of existing licensed spectrum with new users, without relocating the existing users. Licensed shared access ( LSA), for example, allows licensed services to share spectrum in a band with new users without disrupting existing users, while still increasing the amount of spectrum available for other users.

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Spectrum Sharing that Does Not Displace Licensed Users is Coming

Verizon extends cloud interconnect service to Latin America, lights new Europe and U.S. sites

Verizon is now offering its Secure Cloud Interconnect (SCI) service in Latin America, while adding new sites in Europe and the United States, a move that illustrates its aggressive cloud buildout strategy.

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Verizon extends cloud interconnect service to Latin America, lights new Europe and U.S. sites

In Europe, Higher Capex, Lower Revenue is a Trend

It might not be the case in every market, but in Europe, legacy carrier revenue is down, capital investment is up . Revenue gains are being made by attackers, including some that find they are earning more revenue on less capital investment. That is not the case for the cable TV, mobile and fixed network service providers, all of whom are seeing increased capital spending.

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In Europe, Higher Capex, Lower Revenue is a Trend

LTE Now Generally Faster than Wi-Fi

Smartphone users are on average connecting to fourth generation Long Term Evolution  networks at much faster speeds than Wi-Fi , according to Open Signal, a circumstance that might surprise you. In the past, users connected to Wi-Fi because it provided a faster connection than the mobile network. That might still happen, but, on average, LTE connections now are faster than Wi-Fi.

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LTE Now Generally Faster than Wi-Fi

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